In partnership with

Publications


Why do parents bring children with minor illness to emergency and urgent care departments?

Literature review and report of fieldwork in North West London


Using Data Science in Policy

The first report from BIT's Data Science team


Evaluating the Nest Learning Thermostat

Four field experiments evaluating the energy saving potential of Nest's Smart Heating Control


The Behavioural Insights Team Update Report 2016-17

This report sets out the latest findings from the Behavioural Insights Team and its global partners between September 2016 and August 2017.


Improving engagement with pension decisions: The results from three randomised controlled trials

A report prepared by the Behavioural Insights Team for the Government’s Pension Wise service


A review of optimism bias, planning fallacy, sunk cost bias and groupthink in project delivery and organisational decision making

A literature review to accompany our full report, An Exploration of Behavioural Biases in Project Delivery at the Department for Transport


An Exploration of Potential Behavioural Biases in Project Delivery in the Department for Transport

This report looks into how behavioural biases might affect decision-making and delivery of projects within the Department for Transport, and how to overcome them.


Children in need: Project Crewe

In 2014, the Department for Education funded the Social Work Innovation Fund, which aimed to encourage new thinking in how children’s services support young people. The Behavioural Insights Team have conducted an evaluation of one pilot funded through the Innovation Fund, Project Crewe.


Behavioural Insights for Education – a practical guide for parents, teachers and school leaders

This guide looks to equip parents, teachers and school leaders with more tools to make a difference in students’ academic lives by setting out simple techniques informed by behavioural science. While policymakers and educational researchers have traditionally focused on big ‘structural’ factors, such as class sizes or budgets, behavioural scientists have instead been looking at the details of what parents, teachers and school leaders say and do.


Encouraging People into University

Results from a randomised controlled trial that found that sending letters to young people influences their behaviour when applying to university.